Trees

Trees are a valuable part of the landscape. They provide food and shelter for birds and pollinators, and are a great source of shade. They can be used as focal points, privacy hedges, wind breaks or to naturalize an area.

Please click on the plant names for more information.

Beech, Blue

Beech, Blue

Pretty leaves open chartreuse in spring and filter light into a golden shade that is one of this trees most attractive attributes. The autumn color is a subtle orange to yellow and, as the leaves are small, there is rarely much litter in winter. Blue Beech is a native, large shrub or small tree with a widespreading, flat-topped crown.

Birch, River

Birch, River

Salmon-cream to brown bark at first it exfoliates to reveal a creamy-white inner bark. The diamond shaped bright green leaves have serrated edges and deepen to dark green before turning pale yellow in fall.  Vigorous grower, it can be grown as a single trunk or multi stemmed tree. Native to Ontario.

Black Gum

Black Gum

Forest green, glossy, pointy leaves turn an outstanding crimson in the fall. Furrowed black bark adds an interesting dimension to the landscape. One of the most spectacular and reliable fall coloring trees, turning brilliant shades of red and orange, and a very neat, pyramidal habit of growth. Native to Ontario.

Cedar - Jantar

Cedar - Jantar

Invigorating, cheerful yellow foliage on this narrow upright pyramidal grower. More branches leading to a denser appearance than most yellow cedars. As the cooler weather approaches the golden leaves take on a mellow orange to amber hue.

Dogwood, Flowering

Dogwood, Flowering

Beautiful small native tree covered with showy white flower bracts in May. Develops full broadly rounded crowns and likes fertile moderately dry soils. Usually found growing naturally along the edges of forests where it receives full sun to light shade.

Birch, Gray

Birch, Gray

Leaves are poplar-shaped and tremble at the slightest breeze. Unlike other birch trees, the bark of the Gray birch does not peel easily. Bark is dark reddish brown when the tree is young before maturing to chalky white.

Birch, River - Heritage

Birch, River - Heritage

Prized for its incredible peeling bark! Salmon-cream to brown at first it exfoliates to reveal a creamy -white inner bark. Absolutely gorgeous! Diamond shaped bright green leaves with serrated edges deepen to dark green before turning pale yellow in fall.

Buckeye, Ohio

Buckeye, Ohio

Panicles of yellow to yellow-green flowers in spring followed by a nutlike fruit. Compound leaves consist of 5-7 pointed leaflets radiating outwards from the end of a central stalk like fingers on a hand. Fruit is poisionous. Native to Southern Ontario.

Cedar - White

Cedar - White

Native white cedar often called hedging or swamp cedar, although prefers dry sites! Makes an excellent hedging plant that holds its colour well through winter and tolerates shearing well.

Fir - Douglas

Fir - Douglas

Although not a true fir, it is a beautiful evergreen for the larger landscape. Open, tiered branches that are slightly pendulous, it has a conical shape, similar to that seen on spruces. Fast growing.

Birch, Himalayan

Birch, Himalayan

Prized for its brilliant and exceptionally white bark, a lovely addition to the landscape. On young trees, bark is reddish brown but turns to its characteristic white colour as the tree gets older.

Birch, Sweet

Birch, Sweet

Aromatic tree with a rounded crown of spreading branches and odor of wintergreen in crushed twigs and leaves. Brownish black, cherry like scaly bark and reddish brown leaf stems. Golden yellow fall colour.  Also known as Cherry Birch and Black Birch, the fermented sap can be used to make birch beer. Native to Ontario.

Cedar - Emerald

Cedar - Emerald

Perfectly pyramidical bright green cedar that does not have to be sheared to hold its shape. Makes an excellent hedging plant that holds its colour well through winter.

Cottonwood, Eastern

Cottonwood, Eastern

Lustrous green leaves turn brilliant yellow in the fall providing a stark contrast to the white-grey bark. Tiny red flowers in spring are followed by masses of seed with a cottony covering. One of the fastest growing trees in North America. Native to Southern Ontario.

Hardy Apricot

Hardy Apricot

Lightly fragrant white to pale pink solitary flowers are followed by fleshy fruit on this well branched tree. Blossoms are followed by a dense canopy of lush green foliage. Fruit is usually firm and not juicy, with a taste ranging from tart to sweet. Often used for jams, jellies or dried snacks.